Tag Archives: vision and mission

Courageous Leadership Begins with Me

I think that all of us want the best for the congregations, communities, and organizations we serve. However, we may not often reflect deeply about how our own self-awareness plays a crucial role in the capacity to lead in our various settings. Nancy Koehn, Harvard Business School historian, in her newly released book,…

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Living Stones: Recognizing the DNA of Your Church

When a group of church leaders gather, a debate often begins about whether a church is an organism or an organization. Is the church a living thing – full of dynamic life and rich relationships? Or is the church, especially in the 21st century, comprised of systems and programs that require strategic attention?…

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Who Decides Who Decides? Developing an Action Plan

Elders and ministry staff can easily get sideways with each other when it comes to who decides who decides. Clear decision-making processes are vital for healthy leadership, and having written guidelines can help. However, the conversations that help to set guidelines can often become complex! Adapting the research of Richard Chait, I offer…

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Interpretive Leadership: Seeking God’s Preferred Future

Last month we explored leadership as relational work—shepherding to nurture emotional and spiritual well-being. This month we turn to another dimension of leadership: paying attention to God. In any group or organization, one of the critical aspects of leadership is asking the important questions, “Where are we headed?” and “What is our goal?”…

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Dimensions of Leadership

The noted theologian Jürgen Moltmann remarked that in “every period the church has a duty to be clear about its commission, its situation and its goal.” [1] These three things – mission, context and purpose – are very significant for congregational leaders. And each of these things can quickly and easily be lost…

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Leadership Remix

Recently I was reading an essay by Mark Lau Branson entitled “Forming God’s People.”  He makes the assertion that I’ve been thinking about a lot since I read it.  He states that leadership is generally a secondary question.  Rather than asking “how am I supposed to lead,” he offers a compelling alternative.  The…

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